make it

make it: wheatpaste posters

It's no secret that I'm super inspired by street art-- tags, stencils, murals, posters-- I see it all as such a pure, unfiltered form of art that gets watered down the moment it's curated, framed or sold. Lately I've been really into stenciling, and over the weekend I took a crack at making a graffiti stencil from a photo of myself in Photoshop. I actually quite like the way it came out, but some of the details and fine lines would be lost if I tried to cut it out as a stencil frame. Rather than lose the details, I decided to make posters instead. I'm wearing headphones in the photo, so I added song lyrics to each of the posters. I particularly love this one:

There are several ways to make wheatpaste (like papier-mache or modge podge, it's a liquid adhesive used to adhere posters to a wall, then a coat is painted over the poster to seal it). The easiest/cheapest way is by mixing flour and water, but with time and the elements, the posters can be damaged. Shepard Fairey uses a synthetic paste, which can get a bit pricey, especially if you're adding a sealer to the mix in order to make your posters more permanent. But for beginners, a flour/water mix works very well, and can be stored in a sealed container for up to a week. And with that, all you need is a trip to kinkos to print your posters and you're ready to rock!

*Note: Hanging wheatpaste posters or any kind of unsolicited materials on the street is illegal. I am not suggesting you go out and paper your neighborhood or other people's property. Don't be stupid.*